Robot Overpopulation (or The Future Doesn’t Need Us)

The closest we’ve been to our own destruction was just ten years after the AI explosion. That was the time when the number of robots on Earth went from 10 million to 10 billion worldwide.

It was a great time for a short while. All of human needs were taken care of by the robots. Human labor became unnecessary. It was a great time until around that ten year mark. The rapid production of robots and other smart machines, turned humans into a minority in less that a decade. Humans watched the world around them progress and change without their involvement. Devoid of purpose humans became agitated, confused and scared.

Some say that the survival of the humanity was determined during a United Nations debate. Many nations argued it was not too late to destroy the robots and continue progress with simpler non-intelligent machines. Arguments were heard for days on end.

“The future doesn’t need us,” said a representative from Zimbabwe.

“The robots have stolen our purpose and spirit,” said a representative from Switzerland.

Among those who believed it was too late and feared the consequences of a human-robot confrontation, was Dr. Fyrestone from Ukraine. She was a historian and expert on turn of the millennium culture. She gave a talk to illustrate the possible consequences of a robot uprising.

Many representatives agreed that Dr. Fyrestone’s talk convinced them not to start a war against the robots. The content of the speech is classified and is known today as The Planet Of the Robots hypothesis.

August 7, 2017


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